Provide a brief description of the learning activity.

image1.png NORTH LAKE COLLEGE

5001 N. MacArthur Blvd.

Irving, Texas 75038-3899

DALLAS COUNTY COMMUNITY COLLEGE DISTRICT

COURSE SYLLABUS

INTRODUCTION TO PHILOSOPHY (Online)

PHIL-1301-74426

SUMMER II 2019

LIBERAL ARTS LEARNING CENTER

Liberal Arts Division Office: A-310 Phone: (972) 273-3480 Call office for hours of operation

This course syllabus is intended as a set of guidelines for Philosophy 1301. Both North Lake College and your instructor reserve the right to make modifications in content, schedule, and requirements as necessary to promote the best education possible within prevailing conditions affecting this course.

Instructor Information:

Professor: Marcos Arandia, Ph.D.

Email: marandia@dcccd.edu

Office Phone: The only way to reach me during summer is via email.

Course Location/Time: Online

Required Electronic Textbook: Philosophy and the Good Life (Kendall Hunt Publishing), 3rd Edition. By M. Arandia

The e-Book website contains: chapter quizzes, power point slides, test review videos, and an electronic copy of the book.

There are NO other required course materials.

Note: The book can be only purchased from the Kendall Hunt Publishing website:

https://he.kendallhunt.com/product/philosophy-and-good-life-text-beginners

 

Course description: An introduction to the ideas about such things as the good life, reality, God, the acquisition and characteristics of knowledge, and the nature of humans. Students will evaluate both ancient and modern theories about these issues in terms of their logic, historical significance, and meaning in everyday life, as they practice the methods for doing philosophy. Coordinating Board Academic Approval Number3801015135

Course prerequisites: none.

Learning Activities, Outcomes, and Assessment

Learning Activity

Provide a brief description of the learning activity.

Learning Outcomes

Briefly list the specific learning outcomes/ objectives for the activity.

Assessment

How will the activity be assessed?

1. Group discussion and analysis of assigned readings. Students will discuss and evaluate the philosophical ideas presented in the reading. Students will evaluate the theories presented by applying the authors’ ideas to personal and everyday life situations. Students will demonstrate proficiency by devising their own examples or referring to specific experiences to explain and/or criticize the ideas being considered.
2. Writing the Reflection Paper Students will formulate their own analysis of a specific assigned argument. This will involve explaining the major points made and how they logically connect to produce the conclusion. They will then offer criticism of that argument, and cite or create relevant counter- examples. Students should demonstrate that they can isolate the relevant points that form a logically coherent argument. They should be able to formulate criticisms which effectively undermine, through the use of appropriate counter- examples, some premise of that argument.
3. Taking the 3 unit exams. Students will formulate their o Students will provide analysis of specific assigned arguments. This will involve explaining the major points made and how they logically connect to produce the conclusion. They will then evaluate and criticize those arguments, and cite or create relevant counter-examples. Students will answer multiple-choice and short essay questions over particular concepts and ideas expressed by different philosophers in the tradition.

Course Objectives

1. Students will be introduced to the wide range of philosophical questions and topics.

2. They will develop the ability to evaluate and criticize previous philosophical arguments and enter into the ongoing discussion of the most basic questions of life.

3. The students should come to understand how philosophical ideas affect and inform almost every aspect of our lives.

Gen Ed SLOs 1.1, 1.3, 2.1, 2.2, 3.1, 4.2, 5.2

Specific Course Student Learning Outcomes

All students will participate in the following activities to assure that the Core Curriculum Intellectual Competencies and the Exemplary Educational Objectives are met. Professors may include additional activities to enhance the educational experience.

1. Group discussion and analysis of assigned readings via Discussion Board. Students will discuss and evaluate the philosophical ideas presented in the reading.

2. Taking the 3 exams.

3. Writing the Reflection Paper on a particular philosophical problem.

Course of study outline:

Unit 1:

Chapter 1: Plato’s Allegory of the Cave

Chapter 2: Plato’s Euthyphro

Chapter 3: Plato’s Apology of Socrates

TEST 1

Unit 2:

Chapter 4: Epicurus

Chapter 5: St. Thomas Aquinas: Selections from the “Treatise on Law”

Chapter 6: Thomas Hobbes: Selections from Leviathan

TEST 2

Unit 3:

Chapter 7: Friedrich Nietzsche:

“Madman and the Death of God”

“What is Noble?”

“Master and Slave Morality”

Chapter 8: Jose Ortega y Gasset (“The Crowd Phenomenon”)

Chapter 9: Jean-Paul Sartre (“Existentialism is a Humanism”)

Chapter 10: Theodore Dalrymple

TEST 3

Grading: Your grade in this class will be determined as follows:

Chapter Quizzes (Unlimited Attempts, taken on the Textbook Website: new access code required) = 150 points

Three Tests (1 per Unit) = 400 points (Unit 1: 130 pts, Unit 2: 130 pts, Unit 3: 140 pts.)

A Total of 16 Discussion Board postings—One Student Introduction post PLUS 5 posts for each unit = 150 points (Unit 1 = 50 pts./ Unit 2 = 50 pts./ Unit 3 = 50 pts.)

Reflection Paper = 300 points

Total Possible Points = 1000 points

There is no extra credit offered in this class.

Grading Scale:

A 900-1000

B 800-899

C 700-799

D 600-699

F Below 600

As a Test Review, I will give you my pool of questions from which I will randomly choose the 25-35 questions that will appear on the Tests. That way, you will know exactly what to prepare for the Tests. Also, feel free to use your notes during the tests. Many of the test questions are NOT easy, so you will need to read the textbook chapters very carefully.

Discussion Board Participation:

Your activity on the discussion boards is what determines your participation AND your writing grade. There will be on-going discussion associated with every subject area. The minimum expectations for the DB posts are: answer any THREE questions from the list posted for each Unit, then post TWO responses to other students’ posts. Each post must be between 75—100 words. (You may of course go longer if you wish, but you must maintain a minimum of 75 words.) The total number of posts for each unit is 5. That brings the total number of posts for the course, including the student introduction post, to 16.

The discussion boards are a tool for enhancing the knowledge of all by inviting every student to share their insights. All postings should be respectful in tone and rational in content. I realize that some people are intimidated in class and are hesitant to speak up. But please do your best to overcome this. For my part, I will try to provide a comfortable atmosphere where everyone should feel free to contribute. Your discussion contributions will count for 15% of your final grade. The first week of class, you will be asked to introduce yourself briefly to the rest of the class on the Discussion Board.

EMAIL: I check my e-mail daily, and will respond within 48 hours.

Late work policy:

All tests and assignments must be submitted by the final deadline as stated in the Course Outline.

The ONLY way for you to receive an extension is to send me a signed note from a medical doctor, or work supervisor, on official letterhead no later than 24 hours after the due date, certifying your inability to submit your test/assignment on time because of a medical or work-related emergency.  Send this information to me in a pdf file in an e-mail to marandia@dcccd.edu Students must have a passing grade at the time of the extension request. Please DO NOT send me requests for extensions if you do not have the aforementioned written documentation or meet the stated requirements; they will not be heeded.  

How to Succeed in an Online Class:

Many of you have never taken an online course before, and may be confused as to what to do in order to do well. My suggestion is that you set aside a time at least 3 to 4 days a week where you can log in to the Blackboard site to check for announcements and to follow the discussion board. (If you are taking this course during a Wintermester or Maymester, then you need to log in to Blackboard daily .) The more regular you make this, the better connected you will feel and the more you will get out of the course.

If you have any questions, please contact me at marandia@dcccd.edu. I will check my email regularly throughout the semester, but please allow a 24 hour turn around time for my response (except on weekends and holidays). Finally, make use of your peers! I encourage you to get to know one another, chat with one another even apart from the discussion boards. Philosophy is a dialogue—and dialogues are usually more successful when they involve other people!

How to Succeed in a Philosophy Class:

Have you thought about what it would mean to do well in this class? What do you hope to get out of a philosophy class? What must you contribute to the learning experience? You will only get out of this class what you put into it, so the following list is to help you know what sorts of things you’ll need to do in order to make this a truly fun and enlightening experience.

1. Print out this syllabus and have it in the front of your notebook for easy access. Take a look at it throughout the semester to refresh your memory on requirements, grade percentages, office hour times/location, etc. (I spent a lot of time working on it, so I’d love you to actually read it!)

2. Become familiar with the course outline so you know what we’re doing, when we’re doing it, and where to find it.

3. Some readings (if not all) will require that you read them several times before they make sense. This is normal in philosophy—it is also the only way to really understand and begin to formulate questions and arguments pertaining to them. Don’t expect to read quickly through these readings and have anything to say about them—that’s just not the way it works. It will get easier—but it will always take time to make your way through some of these texts. Don’t cheat yourself out of this kind of learning—it is truly rewarding!!!

4. After doing the readings, try to think of a question you have about it. It may be a “What the heck did that mean?” kind of question, and that’s fine. But try to find a way to articulate your confusion—what exactly are you confused about? This is not easy to do, but with practice it will get easier, and it will make you a sharper, more critical thinker in everything you do.

5. We live in the internet age—so make use of this valuable research tool. Often you can find information that will help you understand the class material, whether it’s the background to a specific author or time, a posted lecture, a radio broadcast, interview, etc.

6. Keep in touch! Check the course website regularly to see if I’ve made any important announcements or added any material for you to look at. Checking in often will also help you feel connected to the class, and this kind of connection will keep you on task. When you feel like you are a crucial part of something, you are more likely to stay involved!

Classroom Etiquette:

In order to make the most of this class, a certain learning environment must be maintained. Especially with respect to the discussions, students must be respectful of others’ opinions and views. Discussions should be a place where everyone feels comfortable and free to express herself/himself in an appropriate way, without the worry that s/he will be unfairly criticized or ostracized. Therefore, be mindful of your comments, and make sure that your criticisms are expressed in a courteous and fair manner.

Furthermore, only appropriate language will be allowed, i.e. no foul language or hate-speech. The instructor reserves the right to remove students from class if their behavior becomes disruptive. This may result in an “F” for that portion (20%) of the final grade. If such behavior extends to other segments of the class, the instructor reserves the right to take further action, including dropping the student from the class.

To sum it up: Be respectful!!!

INSTITUTIONAL POLICIES

ACADEMIC DISHONESTY

The Student Code of Conduct prohibits academic dishonesty and prescribes penalties for violations. According to this code, which is printed in the college catalog, “academic dishonesty”, includes (but is not limited to) cheating, fabrication, facilitating academic dishonesty, plagiarism, and collusion”.

Academic dishonesty may result in the following sanctions, including, but not limited to:

1. A grade of zero on the assignment or course.

2. A reprimand.

3. Suspension from the college.

Institutional Policies relating to this course can be accessed from the following link

www.northlakecollege.edu/syllabipolicies

DROP POLICY

If you are unable to complete this course, you must officially withdraw by the drop date. Withdrawing is a formal procedure which you must initiate; your instructor cannot do it for you.

The last day to drop is 7/31/18

The Academic Skills Center (ASC)

The ASC is designed to provide the following assistance to students:

An ESOL lab with computer access.

 

· Free tutoring for students enrolled in foreign language courses.

 

· The iRead Lab offers individual and small group tutoring, as well as workshops, to help current students improve their reading, study, and test taking skills.

 

· The Writing Center to help students clarify writing tasks, understand instructors’ requirements, develop and organize papers, explore revision options, detect grammar and punctuation errors, properly use and document sources, and improve their writing skills.

 

· The Online Writing Lab (OWL) allows students to submit papers to our writing tutors electronically and get feedback within 24-72 hours.  The OWL can be accessed through eCampus.

· After logging on to eCampus, click on the Community Tab at the top.

· Type “Owl” in the search field and click “Go.”

· Next, click on the double drop-down arrows next to “NLC-OWL2,” and then click on “Enroll.”

· Once enrolled, students can receive services from the OWL.

 

· The Blazer Internet Lounge with 12 computers, additional open seating, and WiFi Internet access.

Exemplary Educational Objectives

1. To demonstrate awareness of the scope and variety of works in the arts and humanities.

2. To understand those works as expressions of individual and human values within an historical and social context.

3. To respond critically to works in the arts and humanities.

4. To articulate an informed personal reaction to works in the arts and humanities.

5. To demonstrate knowledge of the influence of literature, philosophy, and/or the arts or intercultural experiences.

Core Curriculum Intellectual Competencies

This course reinforces 5 of the 6 Core Curriculum Intellectual Competencies defined by the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board. The CCI’s identified by the DCCCD which are reinforced by Introduction to Philosophy 1301 are as follows:

1. READING: Reading at the college level means the ability to analyze and interpret a variety of printed materials — books, articles, and documents.

2. WRITING: Competency in writing is the ability to produce clear, correct, and coherent prose adapted to purpose, occasion, and audience.

3. LISTENING: Listening at the college level means the ability to analyze and interpret various forms of spoken communication.

4. CRITICAL THINKING: Critical thinking embraces methods of applying both qualitative and quantitative skills analytically and creatively to subject matter in order to evaluate arguments and to construct alternative strategies.

Addendum A: Learning Activities, Outcomes,

and Assessments for argumentative philosophical papers.

1. Learning Activity: Group discussion and analysis of assigned readings on the Discussion Board. Students will discuss and evaluate the philosophical ideas presented in the reading.

a. Learning Outcomes: Students will evaluate the theories presented by applying the authors ideas to personal and everyday life situations.

b. Assessment: Students will demonstrate proficiency by devising their own examples or referring to specific experiences to explain and/or criticize the ideas being considered.

c. Gen Ed SLOs 1.1, 1.3, 2.1, 2.2, 4.2, 5.2

2. Learning Activity: Writing the Reflection paper

a. Learning Outcomes: Students will formulate their own analysis of a specific assigned argument. This will involve explaining the major points made and how they logically connect to produce the conclusion. They will then offer criticism of that argument, and cite or create relevant counter-examples.

b. Assessment: Students should demonstrate that they can isolate the relevant points that form a logically coherent argument. They should be able to formulate criticisms which effectively undermine, through the use of appropriate counter-examples, some premise of that argument.

c. Gen Ed SLOs 1.1, 1.3, 2.1, 2.2, 4.2, 5.2

3. Learning Activity: Taking the 3 exams and practice quizzes

a. Learning Outcomes: Students will formulate their own analysis of a specific assigned argument. This will involve explaining the major points made and how they logically connect to produce the conclusion. They will then in turn be capable of choosing the best option among the five choices available to them on the objective format test questions.

b. Assessment: Students should demonstrate that they can isolate the relevant points that form a logically coherent argument, as well as isolate the defective points in a logically weak argument.

c. Gen Ed SLOs 1.1, 1.3, 2.1, 2.2, 4.2, 5.2

PHIL-1301

Introduction to Philosophy

Course Calendar

Date Topics To Be Covered Readings /Assignments
Work at your own pace Student Introductions

Unit 1

Chapter 1:

Plato’s Allegory of the Cave

Take chapter quiz

Be sure to obtain a copy of the textbook at this time.

Learning Objectives :

Upon completing this week’s assignments, students will be able to:

1. Examine the distinction philosophers draw between the examined life and the unexamined life.

2. Explain Plato’s Myth of the Cave and its relevance to living the examined life.

Work at your own pace

Chapter 2:

Plato’s Euthyphro

Take chapter quiz

Learning Objectives :

Upon completing this week’s assignments, students will be able to:

1. Analyze the basic elements of the Socratic method and its application.

2. Explain the essential role that questions play in defining an examined life.

Work at your own pace

Chapter 3:

Plato’s Apology of Socrates

Take chapter quiz

TAKE TEST #1

SUBMIT UNIT 1 DB POSTS

Learning Objectives :

Upon completing this week’s assignments, students will be able to:

1. Explain the significance of Socrates’ corruption charge.

2. Evaluate Socrates’ arguments in defense of his way of life.

3. Analyze the meaning of Socrates’ famous proclamation: “The unexamined life is not worth living for a human being.”

20% penalty for late test submissions.

No late discussion posts will be accepted.

Work at your own pace Unit 2

Chapter 4:

Epicurus on hedonism

Take chapter quiz

Learning Objectives :

Upon completing this week’s assignments, students will be able to:

1. Summarize the main principles of atomism.

2. Analyze the Epicurean doctrine of hedonism.

3. Explain the logical connections between atomism and hedonism in Epicurus’ thought

Work at your own pace Chapter 5:

St. Thomas Aquinas

Selections from the Treatise on Law

Take chapter quiz

Learning Objectives :

Upon completing this week’s assignments, students will be able to:

1. Analyze, compare and contrast the four basic kinds of law.

2. Examine the natural law and the four basic human inclinations.

3. Explain how human law is derived from natural law.

Work at your own pace Chapter 6:

Thomas Hobbes

Selections from Leviathan

Take chapter quiz

TEST 2

UNIT 2 DISCUSSION BOARD

Learning Objectives :

Upon completing this week’s assignments, students will be able to:

1. Discuss Hobbes’ State of Nature theory.

2. Understand and critically evaluate the theory of psychological egoism.

3. Explain Hobbes’ Golden Rule

4. Analyze Hobbes’ social contract theory.

20% penalty for late test submissions.

No late discussion posts will be accepted

Work at your own pace Unit 3

Chapter 7:

“The Madman and the Death of God”

“What is Noble?”

“Master and Slave Morality”

Friedrich Nietzsche

Take chapter quiz

Reflection paper

Chapter Quizzes Due by 8/5/2019

Learning Objectives :

Upon completing this week’s assignments, students will be able to:

1. Discuss the connection between the death of God and the advent of nihilism.

2. Explain how an aristocratic caste is fundamental to the ennoblement of the human species.

3. Analyze and critically evaluate Nietzsche’s concept of master and slave morality.

Work at your own pace

Final Due Date: 8/8/2019

Chapter 8:

“The Crowd Phenomenon”

Jose Ortega y Gasset

Take chapter quiz

Chapter 9:

“Existentialism is a Humanism”

Jean-Paul Sartre

Take chapter quiz

Chapter 10:

Theodore Dalrymple

Take chapter quiz

Learning Objectives :

Upon completing this week’s assignments, students will be able to:

1. Define and distinguish between the “mass man” and the “select minorities.”

2. Critically evaluate Ortega’s claim that “the mass crushes everything different, everything outstanding, excellent, individual, select, and choice.”

Learning Objectives :

Upon completing this week’s assignments, students will be able to:

1. Analyze and discuss the claim that “essence precedes existence.”

2. Examine the concepts of anxiety, forlornness (or “abandonment”), and dread.

3. Explain and critically evaluate Sartre’s claim that without God there cannot be any a priori values.

TAKE TEST #3 and submit UNIT 3 DISCUSSION BOARD POSTS

ALL COURSE WORK IS DUE NO LATER THAN AUGUST 8

AT 11:59 PM CST

NO EXTENSTIONS

NOTE: The ONLY way for you to receive an extension to take the test is to send me a signed note from a medical doctor, or work supervisor, on official letterhead no later than 24 hours after the due date, certifying your inability to submit your test/assignment on time because of a medical or work-related emergency. You may send your documentation to me in a pdf file in an e-mail to marandia@dcccd.edu.
 

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